Soldiers bid farewell

At the end of June 1865, the Union Army’s 6th New York Heavy Artillery — my ancestor Pvt. Arthur Bull’s regiment — was reorganized as some of his Civil War compatriots mustered out and began returning home.

http://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/cwp2003000610/PP/
Petersburg, Va. Row of stacked Federal rifles; houses beyond (4 April 1865). Some soldiers from my ancestor’s 6th New York Heavy Artillery regiment mustered out in late June 1865. Before departing for home, they presented a set of veteran colors to those who remained on duty. Photo: Library of Congress

In his diary, Sgt. William Thistleton of the 6th NYHA traced the regiment’s journey  from central Virginia back to Petersburg as part of this post-war troop pulldown.

June 20th Packed up in readiness to move. June 21st started at 4 a.m. and marched to Burksville (sic.) station we were releaved (sic) by the 16th NY.H. Artillery at Burksville took the cars for Petersburg arrived 7 p.m. left the cars and crossed the Appomattox to Pocahontas heights and pitched our tents.

While they were camped, my great, great grandfather’s regiment was divided up — with some soldiers he had fought with for more than a year bidding a military farewell as they returned to their civilian lives. Sgt. William Thistleton was one of them, and he described the scene.

June 22nd the regiment were divided this morning the original members who enlisted in 1862 and the one years men who enlisted in 1864 are to be sent home and mustered out and the three years men who enlisted in 1863 were consolidated with a similar detachment of the 10th N.Y. Artillery and designated the second Battalion 6th N.Y.H. Artillery and were detailed to do provost guard duty at Petersburg. Before we departed we presented them with a set of veteran colors.

My ancestor Pvt. Arthur Bull enlisted in 1863 and was a three-year man, so he remained on duty. According to a Company Muster Roll in his pension file, Arthur transferred from Co. L into “Co. E, Consolidated Battalion 6 and 10 N.Y.H. Artillery,” which was formed on 27 June 1865.

Sgt. William Thistleton mustered out the same day, and here we bid him a fond farewell. His diary has been invaluable in helping me piece together my great, great grandfather’s Civil War experience — from his earliest battles in May 1864 through the end of the war in 1865.

As I have inherited no journal or correspondence from my ancestor, I will be forever grateful that Sgt. Thistleton took the time to chronicle his experience — and that of the 6th NYHA regiment –for the benefit of future generations.

More on my ancestor’s final army days in the next post.

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