Susquehanna River reflections

Letter S: Nineteenth of twenty-six posts in the April 2016 Blogging From A to Z Challenge. Wish me luck and please join me on the journey!

From second grade through high school, I lived two blocks from the North Branch of the Susquehanna River in Broome County, N.Y. The schools I attended were located on elevated ground well above the flood plain. But on my street, the river was a constant presence.

Susquehanna 1993 img096_2
Susquehanna River in Town of Union, Broome County, N.Y. (1993) As a child I lived on the North Branch of the Susquehanna River not far from the Pennsylvania border —  unaware that paternal ancestors once lived there, too. Photo by Molly Charboneau

My dad bought our family’s first house, a small Cape Cod, in the late 1950s without realizing how close it was to the Susquehanna.

“The real estate agent stood in the back yard, pointed at some trees in the distance and said there was a river ‘way over there,’ ” Dad told me. “Well, the following spring, the river flooded and the water was lapping at the edge of our back yard!”

The river at flood stage was unnerving — water as far as the eye could see out our kitchen window, where I watched my classmates on the next block travel home in small motorboats to houses that seemed to float atop the water.

But after the freshet subsided, the land was lush and green. The Italian family on the next block grew a huge vegetable garden; the pear tree by their house bloomed and grew heavy with fruit, and every puddle brimmed with tiny toads for us children to catch. And in the summer, swarms of lightening bugs glowed in the night.

Our block was chock full of children to play with — 52 at the peak of the Baby Boom — but we had no relatives nearby. So after we left the area and I began studying my family’s history, I was amazed to learn that some of my dad’s ancestors once lived there.

I wrote about this in Hidden hometown heritage — how surprised I was to learn about my paternal Broome County ancestors (the Bull, Hance and Blakeslee families) and how the absence of local relatives when I was growing up may have sparked my interest in finding ancestral connections as an adult.

What I left out of that story is that I feel connected to those ancestors not only by heritage, but also by the mighty Susquehanna River — which flowed past our homes, and through all of our lives, going back more than two hundred years.

Up next: Two years: Second Blogiversary. Please stop back.

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6 thoughts on “Susquehanna River reflections”

  1. Amazing how history can repeat itself isn’t it? I think I partly started my research from a lack of extended kin,

    1. So I am not alone in this! I find myself viewing my hometown and surrounding areas differently now that I know about my extended relations who lived there.

    1. I’m with you there. Though I live in NYC now, having a childhood that was closer to nature prompts me to get back into it whenever possible at parks, gardens and arboretums…or shore walking on the greenway along the Hudson River. Nature is there if you go looking for it!

  2. What a lovely name for a river. Water has a great depth and beauty; however, it can also be destructive.
    Thanks for popping by at Barn & Beach on the A to z Challenge, Molly.

    1. As you blog about Barn & Beach, you now all too well the duality of water. But most of the time it is incredibly lovely…just don’t live too close! Thanks for the return visit, Michael.

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