1884: Arthur Bull reapplies for his Union Army pension

First in a new series on my Union Army ancestor Arthur Bull’s reapplication for a US Civil War pension and his family’s life at the time.

When I last wrote about my great-great grandfather Arthur Bull — a Union Army veteran of the US Civil War — I described how the  federal pension office rejected his initial pension application in April 1883.

https://www.loc.gov/item/det1994016863/PP/
Utica, N.Y. monument to Union Soldiers and Sailors who fought in the US Civil War (1900). In October 1884, my great-great grandfather Arthur Bull traveled to Utica to reapply for his Union Army pension. Photo: Library of Congress

The following year may have been a difficult one for my Bull ancestors. Arthur’s health was declining due to war-related disability that made it harder for him to work in the tanning trade.

Pension income was vital for my ancestor and his family — and for thousands of other Union veterans in similar circumstances. So Arthur kept at it and reapplied for his pension the next year.

A new medical exam

On 22 October 1884, Arthur was examined by a new team of pension board doctors in Utica, Oneida County, N.Y. — about 30 miles south of his home in Hawkinsville, N.Y.

Arthur told the doctors he incurred heart and lung disease in 1864 at or near Cold Harbor (in Virginia) while serving as a private in Company L of the 6th New York Heavy Artillery.

The doctors’ notes on my ancestor’s claim and his medical examination revealed the following:

His pulse-rate is 120 per minute; his respiration 19; his height is 5 feet and 8 inches; he weighs 150 pounds, and states that he is 51 years of age.

At Cold Harbor he “gave out” and was confined 2 mos in hosp. & he cannot say of what his ailment consisted. Has now a hacking cough with expectorant and phlegm, has pains about the heart and turns of dizziness.

He is a well formed strong looking man. The heart rate is rapid with increased impulse and irregular rhythm, but without disease of the valves….Pulmonary resonance + vascular murmur are normal. The abdominal organs are healthy. His alleged symptoms are all due to the enlargement and irregularity of the heart, and for this condition we advise 1/4 rating for disability caused by disease of the heart.

Waiting for pension approval

Doctors W. E. Ford, Pres.; M. M. Bazz, Secretary; and W. H. Booth, Treasurer of the local pension board signed and posted Arthur’s new Surgeons Certificate. It was received by the US Pension Board in Washington, D.C., on 29 October 1884.

Then a new period of waiting began for the Bull family to see whether the doctors’ recommendation of 1/4 disability would be approved.

An ancestral legacy

Meanwhile, Arthur’s reapplication revealed many items of interest about my ancestor. From it I learned my great-great grandfather’s height, weight, age and general appearance — along with the service location where he first became ill and the long-term effects of his illness.

I also learned that he lived in Hawkinsville in 1884, placing him near my Charbonneau and Zinsk ancestors — an important discovery in a year with no state or federal census.

Arthur was undoubtedly focused on the immediate future — and sustaining his family — when he reported for a new physical examination and provided these details to the pension board.

Yet I am grateful for this documentary legacy, since I have inherited no photos or other mementos from him.

Up next: A Pension Board referee rules in Arthur’s favor. Please stop back.

© 2016 Molly Charboneau. All rights reserved.

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2 thoughts on “1884: Arthur Bull reapplies for his Union Army pension”

  1. I appreciated the medical reports with their descriptions but it was so depressing to read how he got worse and worse off with each new exam.

    1. Yes, it’s tough going…especially reading the doctor reports…but nowhere near as difficult as reviewing the slave records you have found in search of your ancestors.

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