1884: Doctors bolster Arthur Bull’s Civil War pension claim

Third in a new series on my Union Army ancestor Arthur Bull’s reapplication for a US Civil War pension and his family’s life at the time.

In October 1884, a medical referee from the U.S. Pension Board recommended my Union Army ancestor Arthur Bull for a partial disability pension — but more proof was required before payments would begin.

http://www.postcardpost.com/leyden.htm
Main Street in Port Leyden, N.Y., showing a bridge over the Black River Canal (1889). In Sept. 1884, an affidavit from Port Leyden physician D.D. Douglass, M.D., bolstered my Union Army ancestor Arthur Bull’s Civil War pension claim. Photo: Larry Meyers/Port Leyden NY in Postcards

So my great-great grandfather’s attorneys created an abstract of affidavits — from relatives and doctors who had known/treated him since the Civil War — to verify his  war-related illness.

These testimonials chronicle my ancestor’s steadily declining health, which he attributed to  the rigors of the U.S. Civil War during his Union Army service.

A Port Leyden doctor’s findings

On 24 July 1880, D.D. Douglass, M.D., from Port Leyden, Lewis County, N.Y., treated Arthur for chronic post-war health problems. According to the abstract of his affidavit —  filed on 15 Sept. 1884 and characterized as “credibility good” —  Dr. Douglass testified:

…that he was called to treat claimant on the 24th July, 1880, and found him suffering from debility, asthmatic affection of lungs, “attended with severe palpitations of heart;” that he continued treatment up to Aug. 31st 1882, occasionally; that he was not able to perform manual labor; “would have spells of exhaustion, especially if he exercised too much,” and that the disease being chronic, his improvement is doubtful.

A Boonville physician weighed in

Next was an abstract of an affidavit from another credible witness, G.P. English, M.D., of Boonville, Oneida County, N.Y. In the document, filed on 27 Sept. 1884, Dr. English stated:

…he was called to treat claimant in July 1883 and found him suffering from heart and lung trouble, was asthmatic and had palpitation of the heart of long standing; could call it chronic; thinks it doubtful whether he ever recovers fully. Is still treating him and thinks his disability fully one half.

The testimony of these doctors, bolstering an earlier affidavit from relatives, appears to have helped Arthur’s case. The U.S. Pension Board medical referee recommended a one-half disability pension for Arthur the month after these two medical affidavits were filed.

The rigors of war

Earlier, I wrote about my great-great grandfather’s US Civil War experience — from his participation in the Army of the Potomac’s 1864 Overland campaign and his wartime illness to his later service in the Shenandoah Valley and in Virginia’s Bermuda Hundred.

In 1863, Arthur stepped up to serve in the Union Army during the final push to end slavery and maintain the union — marching bravely into wartime conditions that likely left him chronically ill.

In the 1880s, a new struggle for his military pension was the battle Arthur had to win — and his family rallied round to help him.

Up next: Arthur’s relatives testify in support of his pension claim. Please stop back.

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