1920s: Liz (Stoutner) Laurence’s job at The Boston Store

Sepia Saturday 392: Ninth in a series on piecing together the origins of my maternal grandmother Elizabeth (Stoutner) Laurence’s fashion sense.

Recent posts have focused on my fashionable maternal grandmother Liz (Stoutner) Laurence and her family’s influence on her style. However, Liz’s own retail experience in the 1920s likely also played a part.

She appears below, third from left, next to her friend Lib Handy and her other co-workers at The Boston Store in Gloversville, Fulton Co., N.Y.

The Boston Store and staff (circa 1920). My grandmother Liz (Stoutner) Laurence, third from left, likely picked up fashion ideas when she worked at this Gloversville, N.Y. department store. Scan by Molly Charboneau

Retail sales

The Boston Store — a retail shop located at once-bustling 22 South Main Street — sold quality infants wear, corsets, hosiery and undergarments, along with dry goods judging by the plaid blankets in the window.

If this photo is any indication, Gloversville was a town filled with people who liked to dress well. Or maybe these retail workers were expected to dress the part in the interest of sales.

Either way, my grandmother stands out even in this well-appointed crowd — wearing contemporary clothing with just a hint of bangs accenting her dark, sleeked-back hair. Liz was also statuesque at 5 feet 11 inches — taller than many of the men.

Liz’s wide-lapelled coat, possibly camel’s hair, shows interesting button details at the belt and cuff and reveals a satin sailor-sashed neckline on her dark dress. A slouch purse, with metal clasp and chain handle, and strapped shoes accessorize her look.

Learning on the job

Boston Store ad from the Gloversville Morning Herald (8 June 1917). Source: Old Fulton NY Post Cards

My grandmother Liz may have worked at The Boston Store part-time or summers in high school. She eloped with my grandfather Tony Laurence in 1924, when she was 18, so her retail work would have been prior to that — possibly summers while she was attending teachers college in Oneonta, N.Y.

Judging by the Boston Store ads in the Gloversville Morning Herald, Liz would have had loads of garments and styles to choose from at work.

The prices weren’t bad either — plus they gave trading stamps for future purchases! An ideal place for a young woman to learn what she did and didn’t like — right down to long underwear for those chilling Mohawk Valley winters.

Silk stockings

A memory of my grandmother comes to mind reading the ad’s description of fibre silk hose.

When I was a teenager in the 1960s, panty-hose had just come into fashion although stockings were still around, too. Snags and runs could easily ruin either style, but my grandmother had a solution.

“Always wear gloves when you put on your hose,” my grandmother instructed during one of my visits. “That way, they won’t snag and will last longer.”

With that, she donned a pair of white gloves and demonstrated how to carefully roll a stocking up the leg — the smooth, practiced move of a true fashionista.

More photos of my maternal grandmother Liz in the next post. Meanwhile, please visit the posts of this week’s other Sepia Saturday participants here.

© 2017 Molly Charboneau. All rights reserved.

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3 thoughts on “1920s: Liz (Stoutner) Laurence’s job at The Boston Store”

  1. Liz looks rather nifty in that photograph. I suspect she stood out in any crowd – not necessarily because she was tall, but also because she dressed sharply and expressed herself confidently in other ways as well.

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