Category Archives: Arthur Bull

1892: Pensions approved for Civil War widow Mary E. (Blakeslee) Bull and children

Sepia Saturday 432: Seventh and last in this series about my great-great grandmother Mary Elizabeth (Blakeslee) Bull, a U.S. Civil War widow. Mary was the mother of my paternal great-grandmother Eva (Bull) Charboneau.

After two long years, in 1892 my great-great grandmother Mary E. (Blakeslee) Bull, 53, finally received her U.S. Civil War widow’s pension — which must have come as a great relief as she took a leap into an unknown future with her two youngest children.

Mary’s $12-a-month pension was retroactive to the 30 Jan. 1890 death of her husband — my great-great grandfather Arthur T. Bull, Union veteran of the 6th N.Y. Heavy Artillery who suffered Civil War-related illness and injury.

http://ageofuncertainty.blogspot.com/2010/11/last-month-i-posted-some-highlights.html
Woman in dark dress (circa 1870s). My widowed gg grandmother Mary E. (Blakeslee) Bull was likely relieved to finally receive survivor pension payments for herself and her dependent children. Image: ageofuncertainty

Her minor children, a daughter Alice and a son Waples, also received a dependent pension — but not before additional proofs assured the pension board that they indeed were Arthur and Mary’s children.

In the last post, I detailed an affidavit from their older sister Carrie A. (Bull) Graff testifying to their birth details. Two additional proofs were submitted: a statement from Mary and a copy of the Bull family bible, which was examined by a Justice of the Peace.

A mother’s statement

On 9 May 1892, Mary appeared before a Justice of the Peace in Salamanca Cattaraugus Co., N.Y. and swore that Alice and Waples were her and Arthur’s children:

I am the above named claimant and the widow of Arthur T. Bull. There was living at the time of the death of said Arthur T. Bull the following named children, the offspring of said marriage of said Arthur T. Bull and this claimant. The years, names and dates of birth of such children are as follows: Alice I. Bull, Residence Salamanca, Born Sept. 29, 1876. Waples H. Bull, [Residence Salamanca], [Born] April 12, 1789. Both of the above were under the age of 16 years at the time of the death of said soldier Arthur T. Bull which took place on the 30th day of Jany 1890. A certified copy of the Family Record is attached. [Signature of Affiants.] Mary E. Bull

The Bull family bible

The “certified copy of the Family Record” referred to in Mary’s General Affidavit above appears to be the Bull family Bible, in which family details were recorded.

An antique Bible. Records in a similar Bull family Bible were used to verify the birth dates of Arthur and Mary E. Bull’s minor children so they could receive pension payments.

For the final record in Mary’s file is a typewritten affidavit from Justice of the Peace T. H. Dowd indicating he had seen and verified the Bible record. (Handwritten portions are underlined below.)

This is to certify that I the undersigned a justice of the peace in the county of Cattaraugus County have this day examined the family record kept by Arthur T. Bull in his family Bible and I find the said Bible to have been published in the year 1873 and to contain the following entries: Alice I. Bull born September 29th 1876 and Waples H. Bull born April 12th 1879.

And I further certify that the said entries appear to have been made years ago and that form all appearances the writing appears to have been done at about the times and dates of the birth of said children mentioned above. I further certify that I am not interested in this claim and have no interest in its prosecution in any manner whatsoever. Dated May 10th 1892. T.H. Dowd Justice of the Peace Certificate on file at the Pension Bureau, Washington, D.C.

Widow’s and children’s pensions approved

With all evidence submitted and verified, on 13 Aug. 1892 — 126 years ago this week — Mary E. (Blakeslee) Bull was approved for her $12 monthly Civil War widow’s pension. Not an extravagant sum, but something to keep the household going.

The Buffalo Pension Board also approved the “Additional sum of $2 a month for the following children, until arriving at 16 years of age, commencing Jan. 20, 1890: Alice I. – 16 yrs. – Sept. 28, 1892 [and] Waples H. – 16 yrs. – April 11, 1895.” So that meant support for the children, too.

Thus ends the trail of documents in the Civil War pension file of Arthur T.  and Mary E. (Blakeslee) Bull — with a measure of recompense for the war’s impact on their family.

But this is not the end of their story. For Mary also had to deal with probate issues stemming from Arthur’s passing.

More on this in the next post. Meanwhile, please visit the blogs of this week’s other Sepia Saturday participants here.

© 2018 Molly Charboneau. All rights reserved.

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1890: Widow Mary E.(Blakeslee) Bull’s minor children

Sepia Saturday 431: Sixth in a series about my great-great grandmother Mary Elizabeth (Blakeslee) Bull, a U.S. Civil War widow. Mary was the mother of my paternal great-grandmother Eva (Bull) Charboneau.

As the surviving spouse of U.S. Civil War veteran Arthur T. Bull, Mary E. (Blakeslee) Bull was entitled to a widow’s pension – which she applied for shortly after his January 1890 death.

However, minor children of deceased veterans were entitled to pension benefits as well. Since Mary’s two youngest children — daughter Alice, 13, and son Waples, 11 — were still living at home, her widow’s pension file also includes paperwork on their behalf.

http://www.costumecocktail.com/2015/08/07/lovely-young-mother-with-children-1850s/
Daguerreotype of a young mother with children (circa1850s). When my great-great grandmother Mary E. (Blakeslee) Bull was widowed in 1890, her two youngest children, daughter Alice and son Waples,, still lived at home. As dependent children of a deceased U.S. Civil War veteran, they were also entitled to pension benefits. Image: www.costumecocktail.com

As with Mary’s marriage details, the birth dates of her minor children had to be verified for years when New York State did not require statewide vital records registration. So yet another Bull family member stepped up to help.

Birth details from an older sibling

In June 1891 Carrie A. (Bull) Graff, 31 appeared as a witness before Cattaraugus County Justice of the Peace T. H. Dowd. She stated she was present in the home for the births of her youngest siblings Alice and Waples Bull.

A General Affidavit submitted to the Pension Board sums up Carrie’s testimony about the births of her youngest siblings. (Handwritten portions are underlined below.)

State of New York, County of Cattaraugus, ss: In the matter of Claim for pension No. 427.089. of Mary E. Bull, widow of Arthur T. Bull Co. L. 6” Regt. N.Y.H.A. Vols.

On this 20th Day of June A.D. 1891 personally appeared before me a Justice of the Peace in and for the aforesaid County duly authorized to administer oaths, Carrie A. Graff aged 31 years, a resident of Salamanca in the County of Cattaraugus and State of New York whose Post Office address is Salamanca well known to me to be reputable and entitled to credit, and who, being duly sworn, declared in relation to aforesaid case as follows.

I am a daughter of the above named claimant and was at home with my mother at the time of the birth of her two children Alice I. Bull, who was born at Moose River, Lewis County, N.Y. on the 29th day of September 1876 and at the time of the birth of Waples H. Bull who was born at Moose River, Lewis County, N.Y. on the 12th day of April 1878.

Affiant further says that she was well and personally acquainted with the midwife who attended the claimant at the times and she knows said midwife has since died.

I further declare that I have no interest in said case and that I am not concerned in its prosecution. [Signature of Affiants.] Mrs. Carrie A. Graff

Some Bull family history

Each time I read this affidavit I am amazed at how much I learned from it. Not only did Carrie identify herself as Mary’s daughter, but I learned that Graff was surname of her first husband.

I also learned the exact dates and locations of Alice and Waples’ births — and that they were delivered by a midwife. And Waples’ 1878 birth in Moose River helped me establish that Arthur and Mary Bull remained in Lewis County at least until April of that year.

Carrie also indicated that, like her parents, she lived in Salamanca, Cattaraugus Co., N.Y. — opening up new research questions. Did she move there along with them? Did they decide to relocate to Western New York because daughter Carrie and her husband already lived there? Or did Carrie and her spouse move to Salamanca later, in order to assist her mother after Arthur’s death?

Whatever the sequence, Carrie’s testimony, received at the pension  office on 25 June 1891, surely helped verify her siblings’ claims for dependent pension coverage — while providing valuable Bull family history in the process.

More on this in the next post. Meanwhile, please visit the blogs of this week’s other Sepia Saturday participants here.

© 2018 Molly Charboneau. All rights reserved.

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1890: Rhoda A.(Blakeslee) Whitney testifies to a wedding

Sepia Saturday 429: Fourth in a series about my great-great grandmother Mary Elizabeth (Blakeslee) Bull, a U.S. Civil War widow. Mary was the mother of my paternal great-grandmother Eva (Bull) Charboneau.

My great-great grandmother Mary E. (Blakeslee) Bull set sail, at 50, on the rocky seas of widowhood after the January 1890 death of her husband Arthur T. Bull, 57, a Union Army veteran.

Fortunately, she had relatives to help guide her to safe harbors — among them her sister Rhoda A. (Blakeslee) Whitney and husband William Whitney, then living in Binghamton, Broome County, N.Y.

https://msu.edu/user/beltranm/mourning/mourning.htm
Woman in mourning for her husband, whose photo she wears in a brooch (circa 1896). This photo appears to capture a certain strength that widows must muster to continue on after the death of their husbands. My great-great grandmother Mary E. (Blakeslee) Bull likely drew on inner strength, as well as support of family, in her quest for Civil War widow’s benefits. Image: msu.edu

Testifying to a wedding

When Mary needed to prove the date and location of her wedding — as part of her application for Civil War widow’s benefits — she turned to the Whitneys for help. They obliged by providing a remarkable affidavit testifying to the details.

How did they know them? Because they had attended Mary and Arthur’s wedding! Their testimony from Mary’s widow application file follows. (The document was typewritten except for the underlined portions, which were handwritten.)

On this 26th day of February, 1890, before me, a notary public within and for the county and state aforesaid, duly authorized to administer oaths, personally appeared William Whitney, aged 71 years and Rhoda A. Whitney, aged 59 years, who being by me severally and duly sworn, say:

That they reside at No. 179 43 South Street, in the city of Binghamton, Broome County, New York; that they were present at the  marriage of Arthur T. Bull to Mary E. Blakslee; and that the said Arthur T. Bull and Mary E. Blakslee were united in marriage at Bookdale, in the Town of Liberty and state of Pennsylvania, on the 11th, Day of August, 1856, by the Reverend Willard Richardson, a Presbyterian clergyman.

Signatures of my great-great grandaunt Rhoda A. Whitney and her husband William (1890). The Whitneys provided details of my great-great grandmother Mary’s 1856 marriage to Arthur T. Bull to support her application for Civil War widow’s benefits. Rhoda was Mary’s sister. Photo by Molly Charboneau

No marriage record

That there is no public or private record of said marriage as deponents verily believe; that as deponents are informed and believe it was not then customary among people of said county, at the time of said marriage, to record marriages in town or county records nor required by the laws of said county or state; and that the present whereabouts of said Willard Richardson who married said parties is unknown to deponents and whether he is alive or not is to them unknown.

Deponents further swear that they derive the facts of the said marriage and the time when it took place and where it was performed from a distinct remembrance of the same, said Mary E. being a sister of the deponent Rhoda A. Whitney, and deponent William Whitney being the husband of said Rhoda A.

A sympathetic notary public

William Whitney and Rhoda A. Whitney then signed the document — as shown above — and it was witnessed by a notary public, who declared:

Subscribed and sworn before me this 26th day of February 1890; and I hereby certify that the said affiants are both reputable and credible persons; that the foregoing affidavit was read to and fully understood bey each of them before verification. and that I have no interest, direct or indirect, in the prosecution of this claim. — George Whitney, Notary Public

While I don’t yet know the exact relationship, I suspect that George Whitney was related in some way to William and Rhoda — as they would likely have turned to local family in their efforts to assist Rhoda’s sister Mary. And I’m glad they did — because this clearly-written document aided my family history research tremendously!

More on this in the next post. Meanwhile, please visit the blogs of this week’s other Sepia Saturday participants here.

 © 2018 Molly Charboneau. All rights reserved.

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1890: Widow’s application reveals Bull family history

Sepia Saturday 427: Second in a series about my great-great grandmother Mary Elizabeth (Blakeslee) Bull, a U.S. Civil War widow. Mary was the mother of my paternal great-grandmother Eva (Bull) Charboneau.

When my great-great grandmother Mary Elizabeth (Blakeslee) Bull, 50, filed an 1890 Application for Accrued Pension after the death of her husband Arthur T. Bull, she had to prove several things.

First, she had to show that Arthur was a bona fide military pensioner from his Union service in the U.S. Civil War and that there was an accrued pension amount due.

An unidentified 1850 bride. In her application for a Civil War widow’s pension, my great-great grandmother Mary Elizabeth (Blakesleee) Bull provided details of her 1856 marriage to Arthur T. Bull. Photo: George Eastman Museum

Then Mary had to verify that she was Arthur’s wife and therefore entitled to the accrued amount. This entailed providing the specifics of their marriage as excerpted below. (Handwritten entries are underlined; strikethroughs were manually entered.)

…that she was married to the said Arthur T. Bull on the Eleventh day of August, 1856, at Brookdale in the State of Pennsylvania; that her name before said marriage was Mary E. Blakslee (sic); that she had (or had not) been previously married; that her husband had (or had not) been previously married; that she hereby makes application for the pension which had accrued on aforesaid certificate to the date of death; that her residence is No. 82 W. State Street, City Village of Salamanca, County of Cattaraugus, State of New York, and her post office address is Salamanca, Cattaraugus County, N.Y.

A remarkable legacy

What a remarkable legacy with a few strokes of the pen!

Mary gave her maiden name, the exact date of her 11 Aug. 1856 marriage to Arthur and the  location of their ceremony in Brookdale, Pennsylvania — all of which backed up some of my earlier research.

In addition, Mary gave the address where she and Arthur lived in Salamanca, N.Y., pinpointing where he spent his final days — which was new information to me.

And her signature on this document was my first tangible memento of my great-great grandmother, since I have inherited no photos of her.

March 1, 1890: Widow’s signature of Mary E. Bull on form 3-560, Application for Accrued Pension. (Widows.). Her signature on this document was my first  tangible memento of my great-great grandmother, since I have inherited no photos of her. Photo by Molly Charboneau

Witnesses

Alas, the court and the Pension Board were not just going to take Mary’s word. They also required witnesses and whatever documentation could be pulled together — not an easy task for the years before state-wide vital records were kept in Pennsylvania and New York.

Accordingly, Mary did not go alone when she filed her claim with Cattaraugus County Judge O.S. Vreeland. Pension paperwork indicates that two “reputable persons” went along to serve as her witnesses.

Who were these witnesses and what were their statements? More on this in the next post. Meanwhile, please visit the blogs of this week’s other Sepia Saturday participants here.

 © 2018 Molly Charboneau. All rights reserved.

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1890: Mary Elizabeth (Blakeslee) Bull becomes a Civil War widow

Sepia Saturday 426: First in a series about my great-great grandmother Mary Elizabeth (Blakeslee) Bull, a U.S. Civil War widow. She was the mother of my paternal great-grandmother Eva (Bull) Charboneau.

In January 1890, my great-great grandmother Mary Elizabeth (Blakeslee) Bull, 50, became a Civil War widow following the death of her husband — Union Army pensioner Arthur T. Bull, 57, a veteran of the 6th New York Heavy Artillery.

May 4, 2014: A Union Army reenactor and his wife at Spotsylvania Court House, Va. In January 1890, my great-great grandmother Mary Elizabeth (Blakeslee) Bull, 50, became a Civil War widow following the death of her husband — Union Army pensioner Arthur T. Bull, 57, a veteran of the 6th New York Heavy Artillery. Photo by Molly Charboneau

Mary’s new persona was thrust upon her after two years of ups and downs in her Salamanca, Cattaragus Co., N.Y. household. Among the major events in her life during that time were:

A new round of paperwork

When Arthur died in early 1890, Mary was faced with a double loss. Not only was her beloved husband, and father of her nine children, gone from her life — but with him went the financial support of her household.

So with barely time to mourn, Mary began the difficult process of seeking an income by applying for a widow’s pension — with its own set of proofs and paperwork to be sent in to the U.S. Pension Board.

Application for accrued pension

On 1 March 1890, Mary appeared with her attorney William H. Peck before  Cattaraugus County Judge O. S. Vreeland and filed form 3-560 — Application for Accrued Pension. (Widows.).

The opening passage of her application is excerpted below, with handwritten portions underlined.

On this First day of March, 1890, personally appeared Mary E. Bull, who, being duly sworn, declares that she is the lawful widow of Arthur T. Bull, deceased; that he died on the 30th day of January, 1890; that he had been granted a pension by Certificate No. 315 208…; that he had been paid the pension by the Pension Agent at Buffalo, NY up to the 4th day of Dec–, 1889; after that date he had not been employed or paid in the Army, Navy, or Marine service of the United States…

A poignant bequest

Once she had established that her late husband had been granted a pension and there was likely an accrued, unpaid pension amount, Mary went on to provide other details required of Civil War widows.

And in so doing, my great-great grandmother Mary unknowingly created a rich source of family history and relationships — a poignant genealogical bequest to her descendants, which will unfold in this series.

More on Mary’s widow application in the next post. Meanwhile, please visit the blogs of this week’s other Sepia Saturday participants here.

© 2018 Molly Charboneau. All rights reserved.

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