Tag Archives: 6th New York Heavy Artillery

A fortuitous furlough

Last of three posts on researching my Union Army ancestor Pvt. Arthur Bull in the U.S. Sanitary Commission (USSC) records

At the end of my first day researching my ancestor Union Pvt. Arthur Bull of the 6th N.Y. Heavy Artillery in the U.S. Sanitary Commission records, a staff member placed before me a blue archival box containing manuscripts from the USSC Statistical Bureau archives 1861-1869.

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August 10, 1864: Morning Report of Sick and Wounded in the U.S. Army General Hospital at Elmira, N.Y. Private Arthur T. Bull is one of seven soldiers listed as “furloughed” from the facility that day. Photo by Molly Charboneau 1
It was the last material for me to go through, and I wasn’t quite sure what the statistics collection would reveal about my Civil War ancestor. Where might my great, great grandfather’s name appear amidst so vast a collection of data?

Still, the skilled staff at the New York Public Library’s Manuscripts and Archives Division had already helped me find his entry in a Hospital Directory register — and they had pulled these records as well — so I hopefully opened Box 44 and began examining the folders inside.

This particular box was the first of 16 comprising the Statistical Bureau’s Hospital Reports 1863 Sep-1864 Nov, covering some of the months my ancestor was in hospital. It contained morning reports from hospitals for March-August 1864 in folders arranged alphabetically by location and hospital name.

Folder 5, with reports from Albany to Ft. Columbus in New York State, looked promising since my ancestor had spent time in De Camp and Elmira General Hospitals. So I pulled it out and began carefully leafing through the manuscripts one hospital at a time.

Alas, there was no listing for my great, great grandfather among the De Camp Hospital morning reports. But when I started to examine the reports for Elmira Hospital, there he was!

On a Morning Report of Sick and Wounded in the U.S. Army General Hospital at Elmira, N.Y. – a single page dated 10 August 1864 – Private Arthur T. Bull was one of seven soldiers listed as “furloughed” from the facility.

What a gratifying discovery.

My great, great grandfather was a family man – married with three young children – when he enlisted in the Union Army. Being far from family while fighting in some of the Civil War’s bloodiest battles – and during his recovery from wartime illness – cannot have been easy for him.

So I was relieved to learn from the USSC records that Arthur was transported to Elmira General Hospital, near his home – and that he was furloughed while there and could visit his family.

Finding him twice in this tremendous collection has inspired me to continue researching my Civil War ancestor in the USSC records — where I hope to learn more about his later hospitalizations and treatment near the Virginia battlefields.

More on this in future posts. For now, we return to my ancestor’s time on provost duty in Virginia during June 1865.

© 2015 Molly Charboneau. All rights reserved.

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Footnotes

  1. Morning Report of Sick and Wounded in the U.S. Army General Hospital at Elmira, N.Y., 10 August 1864. Arthur T. Bull, 6 N.Y. H. Arty Co. L. is listed fourth of the names of seven furloughed. Morning reports of hospitals. United States Sanitary Commission records. Statistical Bureau archives. Manuscripts and Archives Division. The New York Public Library. Astor, Lenox, and Tilden Foundations.

Battlefield birthday

During October 1864, while he was stationed in Virginia’s Shenandoah Valley with the 6th New York Heavy Artillery, my ancestor Union Pvt. Arthur Bull marked a special, personal event — his 30th birthday.

He was still young by today’s standards, but closer to middle age in those days when average life expectancy for white men was just over 40  years of age.

Since I did not inherit any of his correspondence, I can only imagine how my great, great grandfather felt to be spending his birthday on the battlefield so far from home and family.

Aug. 2014: Union encampment on Governors Island, N.Y.
Aug. 2014: Union encampment on Governors Island, N.Y. In October 1864, my ancestor marked his birthday on the battlefield far from home and family. Photo by Molly Charboneau

From my research, I know that Arthur was married and the father of three small children when he enlisted. So he may have felt much like his fellow soldier Pvt. Orson L. Reynolds did when he wrote this to his wife:

9 Oct. 1864: A soldier in the army has no intimation of what is to take place one hour hence. He is liable to be ordered away at any time….I think of you and the children often and hope that I may see you all again.

28 Oct. 1864: I can assure you that I miss the society of my wife and children very much and that there is none in this world that I prize so much. I hope all is for the best and that I shall yet return.

Through postal service to the front, Union soldiers received gifts from home — hand-made clothing, baked goods and the like. So his wife, my great, great grandmother Mary Elizabeth (Blakeslee) Bull, and other family members may have sent him something.

He would also have enjoyed the camaraderie of his fellow soldiers to cheer him on his special day — which came during a month of victory and high spirits for the Union Army.

I think of Arthur there in the Shenandoah Valley with a sense admiration and affection — a young man fighting for higher ideals and celebrating his birthday on the battlefield 150 years ago.

© 2014 Molly Charboneau. All rights reserved.

 

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Seeking a soldier’s records

Fourth in a series on how I found my Civil War ancestor Arthur Bull.

Not long after the amazing discovery that my ancestor Arthur Bull fought in the Civil War, I found out that the New York Public Library had the Index to Compiled Service Records of Volunteer Union Soldiers Who Served in Organizations From the State of New York on microfilm.

Since I was now living in New York City, one brisk October evening in 1995 I stopped by the library and strolled down the cool, marble corridor to the microfilm room for a look — and there I discovered two more valuable clues.

The New York Public Library, where microfilm research yielded new clues about my ancestor’s Civil War military service. Photo by Jeff Hitchcock

First, I found Arthur’s Union Army service details giving his rank as Private, his military unit as the 6th New York Heavy Artillery, and listing the companies he served in (L, E and F) — a very exciting breakthrough!

Then I checked the General Index to Pension Files 1861-1934, also on microfilm at NYPL — and up popped an image of a card showing that Arthur had filed for a veteran’s pension on 2 July 1880 and his wife Mary E. had filed for a widow’s pension on 28 June 1890.

Incredible! My great, great grandfather Arthur Bull — once one of my least tangible ancestors — was starting to morph into one of my most documented.

I called Dad to share the news and sent him photocopies of the latest finds. They brought us several steps closer to unearthing Arthur’s story — particularly his military history. Now, where to look next?

After a bit more digging, I learned that the National Archives in Washington, D.C. holds military and pension records — and a request could be made through the National Archives in New York City.

Then located off Varick Street in lower Manhattan — with a spectacular cityscape view — the NARA NYC office became a new locus for my research. With help from archives staff, I sent off a request in December 1995  for copies of veterans records from Arthur’s pension file.

Awaiting a reply, I paused to reflect. Had it really been just four months since I found out I had a Civil War ancestor?  What would the National Archives send back? And where would it take me in the search for my ancestor’s story?

Two months later, a packet of documents arrived.

To be continued.

© 2014 Molly Charboneau. All rights reserved.