Tag Archives: Elizabeth C. (Dempsey) Owen

1900-1920: Frank Owen’s Baltimore family

Sepia Saturday 410: Third in a series about my Welsh immigrant great grandfather Francis Hugh Owen, who married into the Irish Dempsey family in Baltimore, Maryland.

The 1900 U.S. census of Baltimore City, Baltimore, Md., is the first in which I have found my Welsh immigrant great grandfather Francis Hugh “Frank” Owen and his family — and by then he had been in the country more than 12 years and was married with children.

Baltimore street scene showing the Lubins Building and business district (circa 1910). Horse-drawn carts, streetcars and hats worn by all the men  — these provided sources of work for my great-grandfather Frank Owen, some of his children and his Dempsey in-laws. Source: Library of Congress

At the time, Baltimore City had a population of roughly 500,000 and was the sixth largest city in the U.S. — a bustling cauldron of opportunity and challenge for a Welsh working-class immigrant with a relatively young family.

The Owen family’s 1900 federal census enumeration is excerpted in the table below. My great-grandparents likely wed in 1888, since they had been married 12 years. Highlighted is the entry of their first-born child — my grandmother Mary Frances (Owen) Charboneau.

1900 U.S. Census Enumeration of Frank and Elizabeth (Dempsey) Owen – 428 Govane Ave., Baltimore City, Baltimore, Md. Source: FamilySearch.org
No. Name Reln. DOB Age Married Job
27 Frank C. Owen Head Dec. 1856 43 M 12 yrs. Clerk, Straw Hat Factory
28 Elizabeth Wife Feb. 1875 35 M 12 yrs. Mother of 6 children
29 Mary Dau. March 1889 11 S At school
30 Arthur Son Feb. 1891 9 S At school
31 Charlotte Dau Jan. 1893 7 S At school
32 Catherine Dau March 1895 5 S
33 Frank Son Feb. 1897 3 S
34 Evan T. Son Jan. 1899 1 S

The next two decades

By the time of the 1910 U.S. census, Frank and Elizabeth were married 22 years and had relocated their family to 1518 Henry St. Frank was a Shipping Clerk at the straw hat factory.

There were also four more children in the Owen household: Dorothy S. and William L. (both born in 1901, apparently twins), Joseph C. (born in 1904) and John, the baby, (born in 1908). Ten children altogether!

During the 1920 U.S. census the Owen family lived at 424 Stricker St., and my great-grandfather Frank, 65, was working as a railroad watchman — perhaps a less taxing job for an older worker nearing retirement.

Elizabeth C. was 52, and only four children — Arthur T., 28, (a street car conductor), Katherine G., 23,  (a men’s hat trimmer), Joseph T., 16, (a grocery clerk) and John W., 12 — were still at home. They also had two boarders, possibly for supplemental income.

In intriguing job

My great grandfather was a clerk for most of his working life — and I have long been intrigued by his job at the “straw hat factory.”

Frank even listed himself as a “hatter” in several Baltimore name-and-address city directories — and the work must have paid enough to support the large Owen household.

Yet his job somehow never sounded like an impressive calling — at least not until I started researching for this blog post.

It turns out that straw hats were a very big deal in Baltimore City for quite a number of years — and my great grandfather Frank Owen was right in there during the hey-day of Baltimore’s straw hat boom.

More on this in the next post. Meanwhile, please visit the blogs of this week’s other Sepia Saturday participants here.

© 2018 Molly Charboneau. All rights reserved.

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2017: Dempsey-Owen Family Reunion

Giving my paternal grandmother her due, here’s a post about a recent reunion of descendants from her ancestral families.

July 2017: A colorful welcome sign directs Dempsey and Owen cousins to the family reunion in Maryland. Photo: Mary Jentilet

The last post featured a journal entry by my paternal Welsh-Irish grandmother Mary Frances “Molly” (Owen) Charboneau about a 1934 Charboneau Reunion .

So what better time to write about this year’s reunion of descendants of her Dempsey and Owen ancestors?

Ancestral diaspora

My Grandma Charboneau moved to New York State’s Adirondack region from Baltimore, Md., after meeting my grandfather William Ray Charboneau during a summer stay in the North Country.

When they married in 1910 she put down new roots and raised her family in upstate New York. So our Charboneau branch was geographically removed from her large Owen-Dempsey family in Baltimore — a diaspora experienced by other branches of the extended family, too.

Dempsey-Owen Reunion reconnects Welsh and Irish cousins

July 2017: Owen-Dempsey Reunion in Maryland. More than 40 cousins attended the reunion — some of them meeting one another for the first time. Photo: Max

Yet where there is a will to reconnect with family, there is always a way. That’s how the wonderful Owen-Dempsey Reunion drew more than 40 cousins to Maryland in July 2017 — some of them meeting one another for the first time.

The Owen Reunion of cousins descended from my great grandparents Elizabeth C. (Dempsey) and Francis Hugh “Pop” Owen  — Grandma Charboneau’s parents — has been held every few years for some time. My late dad, Norm Charboneau, regularly attended with my mom Peg.

Meanwhile, Molly’s Canopy readers may recall that a Dempsey Cousins Family Research Team — descendants of my great-great grandfather William Patrick Dempsey and his first and second wife, including many Owen cousins — has been connecting and researching together since 2015.

A landmark event

July 2017: Cousins get acquainted. Cousin Barb from the Dempsey Cousins team, center, shares family trees and stories at the Dempsey-Owen reunion in Maryland. Cousin Randy Charboneau, at rear, represented our branch of the family along with his wife Joyce. Photo: Carolyn Dempsey

“What about inviting the Dempsey cousins to this year’s Owen Reunion?” asked cousin Dorene. Cousins Mary and Diane, the reunion organizers, enthusiastically agreed. So that’s what happened — and the group photo captures the landmark event!

Everyone was thrilled to meet their new cousins and reunite with family branches long separated by time and circumstance — and the genealogists and family historians in the group were gratified to find one another and compare notes.

Alas, not all the cousins could make it — so mini-reunions are a possibility for the future. Meanwhile, I can’t help but think how pleased my dad and grandmother would be to see so many branches of their ancestral Dempsey and Owen families uniting once again.

© 2017 Molly Charboneau. All rights reserved.

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