Tag Archives: Jeremiah Bull

A decade in Moose River Settlement

After exploring how Moose River Settlement was established, I wanted to know more about the daily lives of my Bull ancestors after their 1875 move to the then-thriving hamlet.

http://digitalcollections.archives.nysed.gov/index.php/Detail/Object/Show/object_id/295
South Branch of the Moose River (1912). A man driving a horse drawn sled loaded with logs along Moose River in the Adirondack Mountains. Logs piled along the river, and in the distance is a man standing on a log bridge. From 1875-1885, my Bull ancestors lived on this river in Moose River Settlement — an area with sufficient forests, water and transportation for leather tanning. Photo: New York State Archives Digital Collections

That’s when I discovered author Judy Jones — who wrote about her own contemporary journey of discovery after she and her family bought a camp in the area and became curious about its history.

Early in her book Moose River Diary – In Search of The Settlement (2011) she sums up a quest that sounds very much like my own and provides many details I am grateful for:

Now we knew the origin of Moose River Settlement, but that was all. Then, in a series of minute snippets, we learned a little more. We learned that a village of three hundred citizens once bustled in a place called Moose River. There had been a sawmill and tanneries and a boarding house and private homes. There had been a general store and a schoolhouse and a post office and a fine hotel. But then what? And what became of the place?

One of those tanneries employed my great, great grandfather Arthur Bull (a tannery foreman) and his father — my ggg grandfather Jeremiah Bull (who returned to tannery work at age 70).

Perhaps it was Lyon and Snyder’s Mammoth Tannery — built in 1866 at Moose River Settlement and one of the largest in the Adirondack region. Such a substantial operation could certainly have enticed my Bull ancestors to leave the Southern Tier for the promise of steady work in the North Country — and for hundreds of others to join them as co-workers and neighbors.

And Moose River Settlement appears to have fulfilled some of my Bull ancestors’ expectations — because they remained there for a decade from 1875-1885.

Highlights of the Moose River years

During their time in Moose River, my great, great grandparents Arthur and Mary Elizabeth (Blakeslee) Bull saw their oldest children grow to adulthood, start work and begin families of their own. One of these was my great grandmother Eva May Bull who married a local lad — my great grandfather William Lawrence Charboneau.

And Arthur and Mary became the proud parents of two more children — daughter Alice I. Bull and son Waples H. Bull — who were both born at Moose River Settlement.

Yet my Bull ancestors were also growing older, and health issues began to arise during their Moose River years. Arthur’s heart and lung complaints — for which he was hospitalized during his Union Army service in the U.S. Civil War — reasserted themselves, making it harder for him to work.

So in 1880 — about five years after moving to Moose River Settlement — Arthur Bull filed for a veteran’s Invalid Pension from the federal government and began seeing local doctors in connection with his application.

There will be more details in future posts on this and other aspects of my Bull ancestors’ Moose River years.

But first I have news to share about my Irish ancestors — William Patrick and Katherine (Gormley) Dempsey — starting with the next post.

© 2016 Molly Charboneau. All rights reserved.

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A Lyonsdale loss

Fifth and last in a series tracking my ancestor Arthur Bull’s family from the Catskills to the Adirondack foothills (1870-1875).

Three generations of my Bull ancestors — my great, great grandfather Arthur Bull, his wife and children, and his parents — appear to have moved north together from Broome County on New York’s Southern Tier to Lewis County in the Adirondacks region.

http://digitalcollections.archives.nysed.gov/index.php/Detail/Object/Show/object_id/220
Distant view of a 600-tree maple sugar bush near Lowville, Lewis Co., N.Y. (1911). The landscape and climate in New York’s North Country marked a change from what the Bull family was used to on the Southern Tier. Perhaps the harsher 1875 winter proved too much for my great, great, great grandmother Mary Bull. Image: New York State Archives Digital Collections

The Bulls seem to have pulled up stakes in late 1874, after the marriage of Arthur’s oldest daughter in Binghamton, N.Y.

For by early 1875 the extended family was already in Town of Lyonsdale, Lewis Co., N.Y. at the time of the next major event in their lives — the death of Arthur’s mother, Mary, at Moose River Settlement on 15 Jan. 1875.

Vital records registration was not required in New York State until 1881, so I have not found a death certificate for my great, great, great grandmother Mary Bull.

However, a notice of her death and burial (141 years ago this month) appeared in the Broome Republican and was abstracted in the book Genealogical gleanings from early Broome County, New York newspapers (1812-1880) abstracted and compiled by Maurice R. Hitt, Jr. — yet another clue my dad and I discovered together at the Onondaga County Public Library.

BULL, Mary [BR, 27 Jan. 1875] Died 15 Jan. at Moore [sic] River, Lewis Co., NY: Mary Bull, wife of Jeremiah Bull. Age: 65 yrs. 5 mo. 8 da. Bur. in the Shawsville Cem., Conklin, NY.

The abstract does not say whether my ancestor Mary Bull’s funeral took place in Lewis County (where she died) or in Conklin, Broome County, N.Y. (where she lived for much of her adult life and was buried).

But I have visited my great, great, great grandmother’s grave in Shawsville Cemetery, and the inscription on her stone is consistent with the date in the newspaper abstract.

MARY
WIFE OF
JEREMIAH BULL
DIED JAN. 15, 1875
Aged 65 y’rs & 5 m’s.

Mary’s death must have been particularly difficult for the Bull family, coming so soon after they moved north in search of a better life. Was the relocation too much for her? Had the harsher winter weather laid her low? Once again I long for family letters or a diary to fill in these personal details.

With Mary’s death, my great, great, great grandfather Jeremiah Bull became a widower. According to the 1875 New York State Census for Town of Boonville, Oneida County, N.Y. — enumerated on 7 June — he took up residence in a boarding house in the village of Hawkinsville, N.Y., and at age 70 returned to work as a tanner.

The Bull family surely mourned the loss of my great, great, grandmother Mary Bull. But before long they had a happier occasion to celebrate — the 1876 birth at Moose River Settlement of Arthur and Mary Elizabeth’s eighth child, daughter Alice Istora Bull.

More on my Bull ancestors at Moose River Settlement in the next post.

© 2016 Molly Charboneau. All rights reserved.

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A new Lewis County location

Fourth in a series tracking my ancestor Arthur Bull’s family from the Catskills to the Adirondack foothills (1870-1875).

Some time between the 1874 marriage of his daughter Emma  in Binghamton, Broome Co., N.Y., and the 1875 New York State census, my ancestor Arthur Bull once again relocated with his family — this time to New York’s Adirondack foothills for a tannery job in the state’s still-forested North Country.

Bing Tannery nypl.digitalcollections.510d47e3-1bb9-a3d9-e040-e00a18064a99.001.w
J.B. and F.M. Weed & Co’s Upper Leather Tannery, Binghamton, N.Y. (1876). The industrialization of Southern Tier tanneries and dwindling downstate hemlock stands may have forced Arthur Bull to move to the Adirondack foothills with his family in search of work. Image: NYPL Digital Collections

For on 23 June 1875, the state census taker found the family living in a new location — the combined First and Second Districts of the Town of Lyonsdale, Lewis County, N.Y.

The Bull family’s odyssey to this new location was likely forced upon Arthur, as well as other tanners and their families, by dwindling downstate economic circumstances — possibly exacerbated by the industrialization of tanning, which put smaller shops out of business.

According to Hemlock and Hide: The Tanbark Industry in Old New York, an excellent post by Hugh O. Canham on the Northern Woodlands blog:

When the easily accessible hemlock stands in the Catskills were exhausted, tanners looked to the Adirondack foothills for further supplies. Here, water was plentiful, and the Erie Canal and emerging railroads facilitated the shipment of both hides and leather…In all areas, communities sprang up around the tanneries.

Three generations relocate together

My great, great grandmother Mary E. (Blakeslee) Bull must have had her hands full arranging for this move. This would be the furthest she and Arthur had strayed from their childhood homes in the Catskill Mountains — and according to the 1875 state census, they still had six minor children living at home: Carrie, 15, Milo, 13, Eva, 8, Jessie, 6, Frederick, 5, and William, 20 months.

But the census also reveals that she and Arthur likely had help from family who moved north with them. Residing in  the same household was their oldest daughter, Emma E. (Bull) Watson, 17, a housekeeper, and her husband Stephen Watson, 22, who also worked as a tanner.

The Bull and Watson families lived together in a plank house valued at $400 (about $8,900 today) — a higher value than the homes of their neighbors, which seems to indicate that their change of venue was worthwhile.

Nor were the Watsons the only relatives who joined them in the Adirondack foothills. As we will see in the next post, evidence indicates that Arthur’s parents — my great, great, great grandparents Mary and Jeremiah Bull — also relocated to Lewis County, N.Y., around the same time.

To be continued.

© 2016 Molly Charboneau. All rights reserved.

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Delaware County diaspora

First in a series tracking my ancestor Arthur Bull’s family from the Catskills to the Adirondack foothills (1870-1875).

For the New Year we embark on a new trajectory with my great, great grandfather Arthur Bull — Union Army veteran, tannery foreman and head of a growing family. This path leads to the foothills of New York’s Adirondack Mountains, where one of his daughters — my great grandmother Eva May Bull — will marry into the Charboneau family.

But first the family of Arthur and Mary E. (Blakeslee) Bull made one more Delaware County detour back to Town of Hancock (Hancock Post Office) in the Catskills foothills — which is where the U.S. Census taker found them living on 27 Aug. 1870.

By: Keene Public Library and the Historical Society of Cheshire County
Tannery workers in 1870.  My ancestor Arthur Bull and his fellow tanners were having a tough time earning a living in the Catskills in 1870. They became part of a widespread migration to forested areas further north. By: Keene Public Library and the Historical Society of Cheshire County

The family had grown since the end of the US Civil War — with the addition of my great grandmother Eva May, born in 1866 in Pennsylvania, and another daughter, Jessie Ann, born in 1869 in Delaware County, N.Y.

So at the time of the 1870 US Census, the Bulls had five children living at home in Hancock: Emma, 12, Carrie, 11, Milo, 8, Eva, 4 and Jessie, 1 [incorrectly identified as “Lewis” and “male” by the census taker].

Arthur, 36, was still working as a tanner and Mary, 29, was keeping house — but their census entry implies that they may have been experiencing hard times.

No value is listed for real estate on their census entry, and their personal property only amounted to $200 (about $3,700 today) — much less than what they reported 10 years earlier when they last lived in Delaware County.

The decline in the family’s fortunes may have been due to the scarcity of tanbark in the depleted forests of the Catskills foothills, making it more difficult to earn a living there as a tanner. They were also now supporting a larger family.

A nearby cousin?

Nevertheless, they do not appear to have been alone in their struggles. For nearby lived another Bull family — John Bull, 34, a laborer; his wife, Eliza, 32, a housekeeper; and their son Daniel, 16, also a laborer — with personal property valued at just $100 (about $1,850 today).

Arthur’s father — my ggg grandfather Jeremiah Bull — came from a large Catskills family, and John may have been the son of one of Jeremiah’s brothers. More research is needed to verify an exact relationship, which I have found hints of online (albeit unsourced).

Yet I can’t help but think that Arthur and Mary would have drawn some support from having relatives as neighbors, if indeed they were cousins.

Catskills tanners in general were having a tough time — and they became part of a widespread migration to forested areas further north. Arthur Bull and his family joined this Delaware County diaspora some time before 1875.

However, as we will learn in the next post, the Bulls appear to have made one more stop in the Southern Tier first.

To be continued.

© 2016 Molly Charboneau. All rights reserved.

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Hidden hometown heritage

Fifth and last in a series on my ancestor Arthur Bull’s parents and siblings at the end of the US Civil War (1865).

At the end of the US Civil War — when my great, great grandfather Arthur Bull returned home to his wife and children after mustering out of the Union Army — his parents, siblings and their families all lived and worked within 60 miles of Binghamton, Broome County, N.Y.

http://www.loc.gov/item/91680390/
Bird’s eye view of Binghamton, Broome County, N.Y. (1882). In 1865, my Bull ancestors lived within 60 miles of Binghamton — something my family was unaware of when we lived in the same area 100 years later. Image: Library of Congress
  • Arthur and Mary E. (Blakeslee) Bull resided in Town of Conklin, just 13 miles south of Binghamton.
  • Parents Jeremiah and Mary Bull also lived in Conklin — in the household of Arthur’s sister, Mary E. (Bull) Tamkins and her husband, Edward.
  • Younger brother Milo Bull, and his wife Catherine (Hinman) Bull, lived in Town of Triangle, Broome County, N.Y. — 19 miles north of Binghamton.
  • Older brother Norris C. Bull, and his wife Sabra Ann (Howland) Bull, lived the furthest away in Town of Colchester, Delaware County, N.Y. — about 59 miles northeast of Binghamton.

Surprise family ties

Why is this important? Because 100 years later, in 1965, my own family of origin lived in Town of Union — about 9 miles west of Binghamton — and we were completely unaware we had any family connection to the Southern Tier! Nor were the Bulls the only ancestors who were part of our hidden hometown heritage.

As I will discuss in future posts, the Blakeslee family of Arthur’s wife Mary Elizabeth (and the Hance family of her mother) also lived in Town of Conklin, Broome County, N.Y. — and just over the border in Town of Liberty, Susquehanna County, Pa.

All I can say is: Amazing!

My dad, Norm Charboneau, may have had an inkling about our Southern Tier family ties. But he never mentioned anything until we went back to Binghamton on a family history road trip in 1995 — decades after our family had left the area.  In some ways, I wish I had known sooner.

A Southern Tier connection

My family moved to the Binghamton area from Albany County — where we shared a farmhouse with my maternal grandparents — after my dad got a promotion at his job with General Electric in the late 1950s. I was just starting second grade.

Growing up, I thought it was odd that we had no family members nearby. Most of my friends from the neighborhood, and at school, seemed to have loads of local  relatives — grandparents, aunts and uncles, cousins, big extended families.

My local family — on the other hand — consisted of me, my parents, two younger brothers and two younger sisters. If we wanted to see our grandparents, aunts, uncles and cousins we had to pile into the car and drive for up to four hours.

How I envied my classmates and the kids on my street — with their hordes of relatives within shouting distance!

Yet today I sometimes wonder: Was it because I lacked nearby relatives as a child that I developed an interest in my family’s history? Did isolation from my extended family become a wellspring for genealogy research?

Maybe so. But this much I know for sure: Finding and writing about my Bull ancestors living near Binghamton in 1865 has deepened my connection to the area where I grew up — and genealogy research has finally provided me with those long hoped for hometown family ties.

In the next post: Holiday greetings from my paternal grandmother Mary Frances “Molly” (Owen) Charboneau.

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