Tag Archives: William Lawrence Charboneau

1934: A Charboneau reunion in the news

Third in a series on my Charboneau ancestors in New York’s Adirondack foothills during the summer of 1934.

In August 1934, my paternal grandmother Mary (Owen) Charboneau received a Self Book from a guest at the Otter Lake Hotel. In it she wrote about several happenings that summer — including a reunion of the extended Charboneau family:

http://www.the-athenaeum.org/art/list.php?m=a&s=tu&aid=626
Moose River by Levi Wells Prentice (1884). A Charboneau reunion was held in 1934 at Riverside Farm along the Moose River near Otter Lake, N.Y. My great-grandfather Will, 78; grandfather Ray, 46; and Uncle Owen, 23, attended along with my dad Norm, who was 10 years old. Artwork: The Athenaeum

Family reunion of the Charboneau clan was held Sunday, Aug. 12 – 1934 at the home of Wm. Charboneau on the Moose River at Boonville, N.Y. A large gathering were there. Ray, Owen and Norman attended from here. Next year’s reunion is to be held in Prospect Park. Pa Charboneau was the oldest member of the family at the reunion.

I vaguely remembered seeing a news clip about this reunion, so I took another look at the Old Fulton New York Postcards website. Sure enough, there was a write-up of the event in the Aug. 14, 1934, evening edition of the Rome Daily Sentinel.

Write-up of the Charbonneau Reunion in the Aug. 14, 1934. Rome Daily Sentinal. (Click image to enlarge). Source: Old Fulton New York Postcards

Headlined “Boonville: Four Clans Meet In Yearly Events,” the article included a section on the well-attended family get together — spelling Charbonneau with with a double-n (our branch uses just one):

The annual reunion of the Charbonneau family was held on the spacious lawn at Riverside Farm with Mr. and Mrs. W. D. Charbonneau and family. Dinner was served with covers laid for 64.

Oldest attendee and officer elections

My grandmother’s journal entry said my paternal great-grandfather (Pa) was the oldest at the event — and the news clip backed her up.

The oldest member present was William L. Charbonneau, 78, Dolgeville, and the youngest was Clifford Charbonneau, age one and a half years, Old Forge.

The extended Charboneau family was large enough back then to elect officers — though I am still parsing out how they and the other attendees fit into my Charboneau family tree.

Officers as follows were elected: president, Charles Donnelly, Utica; Vice President, Lawrence Charbonneau, Utica; secreatary, Mrs. William F. Karlen, Utica; treasurer, Mrs. Peter Zimmer, Oriskany.

Riverside Farm and the guest list

Curious about the venue, I did a bit of research on Riverside Farm and found a 2003 obituary for Douglas Charbonneau, 86. It said he lived on the farm as a child with his parents Louis and Vera (Jenks) Charbonneau.

According to the 1934 Daily Sentinel clip, all three were at the Charboneau reunion — as was Douglas’s brother Billy. Douglas would have been 12 at the time.

The rest of the guest list — detailed in part in the clipping above — is a roster of Charboneau relatives and in-laws , with the furthest traveling from Albany, N.Y., to attend.

Dad remembered the gathering

When my dad (Norm) and I began researching our family’s history together, he told me he remembered going to a Charboneau reunion near his Otter Lake home town when he was a kid. Perhaps this was the one.

According to my grandmother, my father went from our branch of the family — along with his father Ray, 46, and his oldest brother Owen, 23.  Dad turned 10 in July 1934, so he was old enough to retain memories of such an impressive  gathering — and I regret I never asked him more about it.

Yet my grandmother’s journal and the Rome Daily Sentinal have helped fill in that gap — providing valuable details about the Charboneau reunion that made such an impression on Dad as a boy.

Up next: A recent family reunion of my grandmother’s Dempsey-Owen family. Please stop back.

© 2017 Molly Charboneau. All rights reserved.

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1934: Christmas in August at the Otter Lake Hotel

First in a series on my Charboneau ancestors in New York’s Adirondack foothills during the summer of 1934.

During the 1930s, my paternal grandparents William Ray and Mary (Owen) Charboneau operated the Otter Lake Hotel in the scenic Adirondack foothills of New York State’s North Country.

http://www.postcardpost.com/fc.htm
Otter Lake Hotel. During the 1930s, my paternal grandparents William Ray and Mary (Owen) Charboneau operated the Otter Lake Hotel in the scenic Adirondack foothills of New York State’s North Country. Photo: Larry Meyers/Fulton Chain of Lakes Postcards

My grandparents were known as Ray and Molly to family and friends — and they did their best to entertain hotel guests and encourage return visits.

Since the hotel was closed during the winter, one of the high points at the end of each summer season was the Christmas-in-August party before the last guests departed.

At one of these parties, a guest gave my grandmother a “Self Book” with a calendar, a page for important dates and journal pages for notes. Here’s the first one she wrote:

This book was given to me by Mrs. O’Donnell at a Christmas party held at Otter Lake Hotel August 14 – 1934.

Party highlights and guests

Grandma Charboneau then described the party in an entry that reads like a local newspaper community events column item:

A very lovely Christmas party was held at Otter Lake Hotel on August 14 – 1934. A lighted Christmas tree and presents with a poem for each was a feature of the occasion. Mr. James Burris made a delightful Santa Claus. After the tree and presents, the rest of the evening was spent in parlor games and music. Singing was enjoyed by both ladies and gentleman.

Otter Lake Hotel ice cream dish from the author’s collection. My paternal grandparents Ray and Molly (Owen) Charboneau ran the ice cream stand at the hotel before they graduated to operating the hotel itself. Photo by Molly Charboneau

Even better is the guest list, which includes some of my family members (in bold below):

Guests at the Christmas party – Mr. & Mrs. Louis Migurt, Miss Adelle & Hilda Migurt, Mrs. Nora O’Donnell, Miss Lillian Hundley, Miss Jennie Wilson, Mr. W.R. Wilson, Mr. & Mrs. Edward Manning, Mr. &  Mrs. P. T. De Vries, Mr. James Burris, Miss Margaret Saum, Mr. Wm. Charboneau, Mr. Frank Owen, Norman Charboneau, Frederic Charboneau, Mr. & Mrs. W. R. Charboneau.

My dad, Norm, was 10 years old at the time. Uncle Fred, his brother and hotel roommate, was 16. My paternal great grandfather Will Charboneau, 76, lived locally. My maternal great grandfather Frank Owen, 72, was from Baltimore, Md., and known as “Pop” to the family.  My grandfather Ray was 46 and my grandmother Molly was 45.

Pop  Owen’s summers up north

I once asked my dad about Pop’s presence at this gathering. He said by then Pop had given up his Baltimore, Md., home and took turns staying with one or another of his children throughout the year.

My grandmother’s turn came in the summer so Pop could spend the hot months up north at the hotel. That’s how he ended up at the August Christmas party.

Pop was born in Wales and Dad considered him quite a character. “Every day he would put on a World War I pith helmet and march across the street and up the hill to Norton’s store, near the railroad tracks, to pick up the mail,” he said. A cousin told me Pop also drank a daily glass of Epsom salts and took cold bath as a constitutional.

I am grateful to Nora O’Donnell for giving Grandma Charboneau the “Self Book” that inspired her to write about this party and several other happenings that summer. There was even a brief entry about a Charboneau family reunion!

More in the next post. Please stop back!

© 2017 Molly Charboneau. All rights reserved.

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1870: Laurent Charbonneau – from sawyer to farmer

Eighth and last in this series about my paternal Charbonneau and Zinsk ancestors in New York State’s Adirondack region during the 1800s.

The last few posts have outlined some of what I know about family of my great, great grandparents Laurent Charles and Ursula Angeline (Zinsk) Charbonneau — who lived in Hawkinsville, Oneida County, N.Y. from the mid-1850s. A brief look at Laurent’s occupational transition — from sawyer to farmer — seems like a good way to conclude this series.

Barn with rainbow. By 1870, my great, great grandfather had gone from laboring as a sawyer to working the 37-acre family farm he owned in Hawkinsville, Oneida County, N.Y. By: Mark Goebel

Laurent the lumberman

When my Quebecois immigrant great, great grandfather Laurent Charles Charbonneau, 33, was enumerated in the 1865 New York State census for Boonville, Oneida County, he was working as a sawyer — a common occupation with so many lumber mills operating in the forested Adirondack foothills.

He was married to my Swiss immigrant gg grandmother Ursula Angeline (Zinsk) Charbonneau, 30, and they had one son — my great grandfather Willard, 7.

Although they did not own land in 1865, they lived in a frame house and Laurent was working — so they were off to a respectable start after less than ten years of marriage.

Within a few years, their fortunes had improved. According to the Gazeteer and Business Directory of Oneida County for 1869, compiled and published by Hamilton Child, Laurent had become a farmer. Here is his listing, from page 159:

Charbonno, Lawrence, (Hawkinsville,) Lot 31, Farmer, 37.

At the start of the Business Directory there is a list of Explanations to Directory, which includes this important note:

Figures after the occupation of farmers, indicate the number of acres of land owned or leased by the parties.

A good sized farm

I was impressed to discover these details about my gg grandfather’s family farm. Whispering Chimneys, the farm where I spent my early childhood, covered 10 acres — which seemed pretty big to me at the time. The Business Directory indicates Laurent Charbonneau’s farm, at 37 acres, was nearly four times that size!

A year after the Business Directory was published, the 1870 U.S. census for Boonville, Oneida, N.Y., confirmed that Laurent was working as a farmer and indicated that he owned his land (rather than leased it) — making him the second agricultural ancestor I have documented.

Under the category “Value of Real Estate Owned,” the 1870 census reports the following about the Charbonneau family farm:

  • Ques. 8 – Value of Real Estate – $940 [about $16,500 today]
  • Ques. 9 – Value of Personal Estate – $265 [about $4,650 today]

Keeping up with the neighbors

Of course, Laurent may have continued sawing lumber on the side to bring in extra income — possibly during the fallow winter months. However, the value of the Charbonneau family’s land and personal property was in line with what most nearby families reported in the 1870 federal census — so my ancestors were doing as well as their neighbors.

These discoveries got me wondering: What were farming conditions like in Town of Boonville — which encompassed the Hawkinsville area where the Charbonneau farm was located? Were there maps of the area that might pinpoint the  farm’s location? And what was actually produced by my ancestors’ farm?

Which means I am off again on the research trail to see what else I can learn about my Charbonneau-Zinsk ancestors!

Meanwhile, St. Patrick’s Day is nearly here. Please stop back throughout March for posts about my Irish (Dempsey) and Welsh (Owen) ancestors in Baltimore City, Baltimore County, Maryland.

© 2017 Molly Charboneau. All rights reserved.

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1894: Hattie Charbonneau attends Sunday School

Seventh in a series about my paternal Charbonneau and Zinsk ancestors in New York State’s Adirondack region during the 1800s.

My great grandfather Will Charboneau’s younger sister Harriet — better known as Hattie — had the genealogical misfortune of coming of age in New York State’s Adirondack region during a period for which records are hard to come by.

https://www.google.com/search?q=Forestport+Presbyterian+Church&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjLscL0qu3RAhUG_IMKHT0VAysQ_AUICigD&biw=1168&bih=497#imgrc=8uE49rR_qw7UZM%3A
Presbyterian Church, Forestport, Oneida, N.Y., founded in 1839.  During a 1992 family history road trip, my dad and I discovered references to Hattie Charbonneau in this church’s Sunday School attendance records. Photo: Woodgate Library – Fallon Collection

Most of the 1890 U.S. census returns were destroyed in a fire, and the 1892 New York State census records for Oneida County are missing. By the next census, in 1900, she was married.

So I have little information about Hattie as a child or a single young woman beyond the 1880 U.S. census for Boonville, Oneida County, N.Y. — enumerated when she was just 4 years old.

Road trip with Dad yields clues

Nevertheless, armed with the evidence we had, my dad and I made a valuable discovery about Hattie on a family history road trip to Forestport, Oneida County, N.Y., in 1992.

From my great, great grandfather Laurent Charbonneau’s obituary, we knew his 1903 funeral was held at the Presbyterian Church in Forestport (pictured above). So we decided to stop at the church to see if they had any records.

Making a cold call at the church without advance notice was a long shot — but our effort was rewarded. The minister drove up just after we arrived, and she was happy to show us the few records they had.

Dad’s disillusioning discovery

Dad and I divided up the work: he reviewed the minutes of the Presbyterian Church meetings and I tackled the Sunday School attendance records.

Dad didn’t find any references to our family members in the minutes — but he did unearth something else.

“You know, I’ve lost respect for some of the prominent names in town based on their dismal meeting participation,” Dad remarked dryly when he finished his task.

He grew up in the area, so this disillusioning discovery tarnished his childhood image of the town — one of the pitfalls of family history research that fledgling genealogists are warned about.

Hattie’s attendance records

Fortunately, I did better with the Sunday School attendance records. Jotted here and there in the ledger books was Hattie Charbonneau’s name (with various spellings) — as summarized in the table below, with her age added as a point of reference.

Sunday School Attendance Records – Forestport, Oneida County, N.Y. Source: Transcript in author’s files
Year Page Name Age
1894 8 Hattie Charbonneau 18
1895 36 Hattie Charbono 19
1896 64 Halter Cherbono 20
1897 92 Hattie Charbonnos 21
1898 125 Hattie Charbonnos 22

There was no scanning or photocopy equipment available at the church, and our visit predated smartphones, tablets and portable scanning devices — so we could not copy the records. But Dad and I were still thrilled with this discovery.

While Dad chatted with a man who had popped by the church — someone he recognized from childhood — I carefully transcribed what we’d found.

From Lutheran to Presbyterian

Hattie’s presence in the Presbyterian Church records over a period of years seems to indicate that my Charbonneau ancestors had a longstanding relationship with this church.

They may have become Presbyterians after their previous German Evangelical Lutheran Church parish declined — a second transition for Laurent, who was raised Roman Catholic in Quebec.

The family’s change in church affiliation points to a possible new line of research into the lives of my immigrant great, great grandparents Laurent Charles and Ursula Angeline (Zinsk) Charbonneau and their three children — Will, Herbert and Harriet (Hattie) — in the late 1800s.

Please stop back next week when this series concludes with Laurent’s transition from lumberman to family farmer.

© 2017 Molly Charboneau. All rights reserved.

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1876: Hattie joins the Charbonneau family

Sixth in a series about my paternal Charbonneau and Zinsk ancestors in New York State’s Adirondack region during the 1800s.

When they were in their forties, my great, great grandparents Laurent Charles and Ursula Angeline (Zinsk) Charbonneau welcomed their last child into the world — a little girl, Harriet M. Charbonneau, who was better known as Hattie.

Little girl on a farm (1889). What did the Charbonneaus make of little Hattie, the youngest child who brightened their maturing family in 1876? By: Internet Archive Book Images

She appears with a surname variant as Hattie M. Sherbenon, 4, in the 1880 U.S. Census for Forestport, Oneida County, N.Y. — placing her birth around 1876.

My great grandfather Will Charboneau was 22 and still living with his parents, and his brother Herbert was 13.

The table below shows the Charbonneau household on 9 June 1880 — the day the census taker called.

1880 U.S Census – Town of Boonville, Oneida County, N.Y. – Household of Laurent Charles Charbonneau – Page 7, Family 69 – Source: FamilySearch.org

Pers. No. Name Age Reln. Job Where Born
25 Lawrence Sherbenon 47 Head Farmer Canada
26 Ursula Sherbenon 45 Wife Keeping House Switz.
27 Willard Sherbenon 22 Son Farmer N.Y.
28 Hulbert B. Sherbenon 13 Son At school N.Y.
29 Hattie M. Sherbenon 4 Dau. At home N.Y.

Three families in one

I am particularly fond of this ancestral family because it reminds me of my own family growing up.

We had similar gaps in age among siblings. I was born first; my two brothers, close in age, arrived a few years later; and a while after that my two sisters, also close in age.

Our birthdays span the entire post-1950s Baby Boom era — and we often joke that it was like having three families in one. The Laurent Charbonneau household in 1880 looks much the same.

The oldest boy, my great grandfather Will, was a young adult working the family farm with his father. Herbert was a teenager at school. Then along came their little sister, Hattie, to brighten up the household.

I have to wonder: How did Hattie feel as the youngest in an older family? What did the family make of this little girl running around in their midst? And how did my great, great grandparents cope with a having a grown son, a teenage son and a young daughter under one roof?

Looking to the future

I suspect Laurent and Ursula were happy to be surrounded by their “three families” of surviving children — all of whom had made it past the high-risk infant years, unlike their second child Ludwig Nicholaus. The Charbonneaus were now a maturing family looking to the future.

Ten years earlier, during the 1870 N.Y. State census of Boonville, Oneida County, N.Y., their household included Ursula’s father Nicholas Zinsk, 84 — who may have required caregiving on her part — and her brother, Bernard Zinsk, 40, a carpenter.

By 1880, it was just Ursula, Laurent and their children living on the Charbonneau farm — with my great grandfather Will of an age to move out and set up a household of his own, and Herbert not far behind. But what more do we know about Hattie, their youngest?

Up next: Hattie Charbonneau attends Sunday School. Please stop back.

© 2017 Molly Charboneau. All rights reserved.

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