Summer of recovery

In June 1864,  my ancestor Union Army Pvt. Arthur Bull was admitted to hospital in Washington, D.C. then transported north — through New York City to New Rochelle, N.Y., and finally by boat to De Camp General Hospital on Davids Island just offshore.

De Camp General Hospital, where Arthur Bull was admitted on 18 June 1864 and convalesced during July and August. Source: Westchester County Archives
De Camp General Hospital, where Arthur Bull was admitted on 18 June 1864 and convalesced during July and August. Source: Westchester County Archives

There on 18 June 1864 Arthur joined a new army of more than 2,100 ill and injured soldiers at what was then the U.S. Army’s largest general hospital — surely a welcome respite after the rigors of the battlefields.

Founded as a Union hospital, De Camp’s population rose and fell with the tides of the Civil War — with more than 2,500 Confederate prisoners temporarily treated there after the July 1863 Battle of Gettysburg before being moved elsewhere.

Looking northeast from my home in Queens Co., N.Y., I am amazed that the sky I see is the sky Arthur saw during his summer of recovery — Davids Island is that close, about 20 miles away. I wondered: Would it be possible to go there? The answer: Alas, no.

De Camp’s pavilions and tents, echoing with the hustle bustle of treating wartime casualties, along with the steamships plying the waters back and forth to transport patients — those tangibles are all gone, cleared for development. But their traces live on in records, lithographs and histories of families like mine that were touched by them.

What was daily life at De Camp General Hospital like for Arthur 150 years ago? We will find out together as I research anew over the summer.

© 2014 Molly Charboneau. All rights reserved.

 

 

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