Tag Archives: Andrew J. (Pete) Stoutner

1875-1880: New additions to the Stoutner family

Sepia Saturday 560. Twelfth in a series on my maternal German ancestors, the Stoutners, of Gloversville, Fulton Co., N.Y.

Christina (Albeitz) Stoutner (1844-1924). Scan by Molly Charboneau

When the 1875 New York State census was enumerated, there were two new additions to the blended family of my maternal great-great grandparents Andrew and Christina (Albeitz) Stoutner of Gloversville, Fulton County, New York.

Their first surviving child together — John H. Stoutner (b. 1869) — appeared in the 1870 U.S. census, along with the family’s two older children William and Mary E. Stoutner from Andrew’s second marriage.

By 1875, two more children had been born to the couple — a daughter Gertrude (b. 1871) and a son Andrew “Pete” Jr. (b. 1874). Pete is my great grandfather. And by 1880, the younger children were all in school, as shown in the table below.

Family of Andrew and Christina (Albeitz) Stoutner in the 1875 NYS[1]FamilySearch requires free login to view records. and 1880 U.S.[2]Ibid.censuses of Johnstown/Gloversville, Fulton Co., N.Y. – Source: FamilySearch
Name Age in 1875 Job/Details 1875 Age in 1880 Job/Details 1880
Andrew Stoutner 42 Brick Mfg.; Born in Germany; Naturalized; Brick house worth $2,000 47 Brick Mfg.; Born in Germany
Christina Stoutner  30 Born in Germany 35 Keeping House; Born in Germany
William Stoutner 14 Works in brick yard; Unemployed for 6 mos. 18 Brick Maker
Mary E. Stoutner 11 16
John Stoutner 6 10 At school
Gertrude Stoutner 3 yrs. 11 mos. 8 At school
Andrew Stoutner Jr. 9 mos. 5 At school

A family of teens and toddlers

Andrew Stoutner Sr. (1832-1910). Scan by Molly Charboneau

During these years, the Stoutner household was a mix of teens and toddlers — with William and Mary becoming young adults while their younger siblings were at play and at school. Undoubtedly a busy and boisterous home with such a wide age spread among the children.

Andrew Sr. followed brick making tradition by bringing his oldest son William into the business during his teens — perhaps only on a part-time basis in 1875, since the census indicates that at age 14 he was unemployed for 6 months that year. By 1880, William, 18, had graduated to Brick Maker.

Nor was this uncommon in other upstate New York industries at the time — as I discovered while researching my dad’s Uncle Albert, who began work in an Adirondack saw mill at age 15. He went on to a career in lumber.

The dawn of photography

I dearly wish that photography had been widespread enough for there to be a group shot of the Stoutner family during this period. Yet despite advances during the U.S. Civil War, most photos were take in studios — or by traveling professionals who might photograph a family home for a fee.

My maternal great grandfather Andrew “Pete” Stoutner, Jr. c. 1880 at about age 5. Pete was the son of Andrew Stoutner and his third wife, my great-great grandmother Christina (Albeitz) Stoutner. Scan by Molly Charboneau

Fortunately, my Stoutner ancestors seem to have taken to photography — perhaps to send photos back home — because I have inherited a number of studio shots, including one of my great grandfather Pete (above) as a child and another of his older half-sister Mary (below) taken around the same time.

Mary E. Stoutner c. 1880 at about age 16. Mary was the daughter of Andrew Stoutner and his late second wife Elizabeth — and the older half-sister of my great-grandfather Pete. Scan by Molly Charboneau

Alas, I have no photos of the other Stoutner children in their youth. Nevertheless, these two studio portraits of Pete and Mary amply illustrate the age and maturity range among the Stoutner siblings toward the end of the 19th Century.

Up next: Some technical work on Molly’s Canopy will require a few weeks off, but blogging should resume by the end of March — or early April for the A to Z Challenge 2021. Please stop back! Meanwhile, please visit the blogs of this week’s other Sepia Saturday participants here.

© 2021 Molly Charboneau. All rights reserved.

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References

References
1 FamilySearch requires free login to view records.
2 Ibid.

Introducing Christina (Albeitz) Stoutner

Sepia Saturday 554. Sixth in a series on my maternal German ancestors, the Stoutners, of Gloversville, Fulton Co., N.Y.

My maternal great-great grandmother Christina (Albeitz) Stoutner — the third wife of Andrew Stoutner Sr.  —  is shown here in an undated studio photo wearing a stunning beaded outfit.

She was born in the mid 1800s in Germany — but as with many of my other immigrant ancestors, there is some mystery about the details.

Undated photo of Christina (Albeitz) Stoutner by Frey Photography of Syracuse, N.Y. My maternal great-great grandmother Christina was born in the mid 1800s in Germany, but as with many of my immigrant ancestors, there is some mystery about the details. Scan by Molly Charboneau

When was Christina born?

Sources below place her birth between 1842 and 1845. While most indicate Christina was born in Germany, the earliest source says she was born in Prussia — the portion of Germany located south of the Baltic Sea.

To find the most accurate birth date, the obvious solution is to locate Christina’s birth or baptismal registration in Germany/Prussia. Ah, if only it were so easy!

With so many family lines to research, I decided years ago that I would focus on tracing each immigrant ancestor from their arrival in the U.S. — so I have not yet researched Christina’s early life. Which leaves me with the sources shown here.

Christina (Albeitz) Stoutner’s Date of Birth – Sources: FamilySearch (census entries) and family records (death certificate and tombstone photo)
Source Location Name Age Born Birthplace
1870 US census Johnstown, Fulton Co., New York Christina Stoutner 26 1844 (estimated) Prussia
1875 NYS census Johnstown, New York Christina Stoutner 30 1845 (estimated) Germany
1880 US census Gloversville, Fulton Co., New York Cristine Stoutner 35 1845 (estimated) Germany
1900 US census Gloversville, New York Christina Stoutner 56 June 1843 (penned) Germany
1905 NYS census Gloversville, New York Christine Stoutner 61 1844 (estimated) Germany
1910 US census Gloversville, New York Christina Stoutner 65 1845 (estimated) Germany
1915 NYS census Gloversville, New York Christina Stoutner 71 1844 (estimated) Germany
1920 US census Gloversville, New York Christina Stoutner 75 1845 (estimated) Germany
1924 NYS Death Certif. Gloversville, New York Christina Stoutner 81 yrs, 9 mos, 17 days Aug. 1, 1842 (penned) Germany
Tombstone: Prospect Hill Cemetery Gloversville, New York Christina Stoutner, wife of Andrew Stoutner 80 (calculated from engraved date of death: May 17, 1924) Aug. 1, 1844 (engraved)

Estimated, penned and engraved dates

The census is an imprecise genealogical tool, since it was designed to collect demographic data rather than link us to our ancestors. Nevertheless, it does offer clues to point us in the right direction.

At census time, Christina (or a household member) gave her age to the census taker — and her year of birth was later estimated by indexers. As she appears to have a summer birthday (in either June or August) a different birth year — either 1844 or 1845 — might be estimated from her age depending on the month the census was taken.

The 1900 federal census is the only one with a specific month and year for Christina penned in by the census taker (June 1843) — and it varies from the other census returns.

I believe this is a census-taker error, because the same household enumeration in 1900 shows an inaccurate birth year (1863) for Andrew and Christina’s son Andrew Jr., 26. He was actually born in 1875.

Tombstone of Christina (Albeitz) Stoutner, Prospect Hill Cemetery, Gloversville, N.Y. (1992) My best guess is that Christina’s date of birth as engraved on her tombstone — Aug. 1, 1844 — is probably accurate. Photo: Molly Charboneau

Settling for a best guess

The details on Christina’s death certificate were supplied by a funeral director, rather than a family member, so that date-of-birth information is also suspect.

My best guess, until I find additional sources, is that Christina’s date of birth as engraved on her tombstone — Aug.1, 1844 — is probably more accurate. Her children likely supplied the information for the stone at the time of her death/burial — possibly from family records and/or their own knowledge.

Clearly, more research is needed on my great-great grandmother Christina’s birth and early years. For now, on to her life after immigration.

Up next: Christina (Albeitz) Stoutner’s mysterious U.S. arrival. Please stop back! Meanwhile, please visit the blogs of this week’s  other Sepia Saturday participants here.

© 2021 Molly Charboneau. All rights reserved.

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The Stoutners’ brick house at 4 Wells Street, Gloversville, NY

Sepia Saturday 508. Second in a new series my maternal German ancestors the Stoutners of Gloversville, Fulton Co., N.Y.

In August 1992, I went with my mom Peg (Laurence) Charboneau on a genealogy road trip to Gloversville, N.Y., so she could show me around her childhood home town. In particular I wanted to see the many ancestral homes that appeared in census and other records.

One of the houses we visited and photographed was the home of her German immigrant great-grandparents Andrew and Christina (Albeitz) Stoutner at 4 Wells St. near East Fulton — a house my mom knew well.

The Stoutner home in 1992. My great, great grandfather Andrew Stoutner, Sr. built this house circa 1882 with bricks from his brick works. Home to three generations of Stoutners, the house was 110 years old when I snapped this photo during a  genealogy road trip with my mom. Photo by Molly Charboneau

The Stoutner home is one of my favorites because it was built with brick from Andrew Stoutner’s brick works in Berkshire, on the outskirts of Gloversville. On the summer day when Mom and I visited, the house looked lovely — dappled with sun and surrounded by mature trees.

Pride of place

My Stoutner immigrant ancestors were clearly proud of this house. They even had photo cards made of their 4 Wells St. home — perhaps to send to family back in Prussia as a symbol of their successful new life.

Photo card of Stoutner home at 4 Wells. St. (circa 1908). The woman at the left is my German immigrant great-great grandmother Christina (Albeitz) Stoutner. One of the men may be my German immigrant great-great grandfather Andrew Stoutner Sr. but the men’s faces are unclear. I don’t recognize the younger man. Scan by Molly Charboneau

In his will, Andrew Stoutner Sr. left the house to his wife Christina and — after she no longer had use of it — to their son Andrew J. “Pete” Stoutner, Jr.

That’s how my  maternal grandmother Elizabeth (Stoutner) Laurence — Pete’s oldest child — came to grow up in the house at 4 Wells St., and why my mom was so familiar with this ancestral home.

My grandmother’s details

My grandmother Liz was a meticulous record keeper. She ran an antique shop when I was growing up — and I remember seeing record books in which she carefully logged purchase price, sale price and other details about her vintage business.

Fortunately, she was also meticulous about labeling her family photos. So she wrote details on the back of the Stoutner house photo about their home at 4 Wells St. — including that it was constructed with Stoutner bricks.

In my maternal grandmother’s words. My maternal grandmother Liz (Stoutner) Laurence grew up at 4 Wells St. Shown are the details she wrote on the back of the house photo about the Stoutner home — including its construction with Stoutner bricks. Scan by Molly Charboneau

In her description, Andrew Sr. is our German immigrant ancestor, and Andrew Jr. is his son (her father Pete). Of special note is her closing sentence, “Birthplace of Andrew Jr. and his family.”

In the days before hospital delivery, women gave birth at home. So my great-grandfather Pete Stoutner and his siblings John and Gertrude were born at 4 Wells Street, as were my grandmother Liz and her younger siblings Andy and Margaret. Making this house special indeed!

Still standing strong

Naturally, I wanted to see if the 4 Wells St. home is still standing, so I did an Internet search of the address.

Happily, the house is still there — although it has undergone some aesthetic and structural changes since the Stoutners’ time. I was also pleased to discover that a real estate site included interior views of this ancestral home, which I have never been inside of.

Contemporary photo of 4 Wells St. The bricks have been painted green, the original front porch has been removed, and a second story was added to the side room. But the basic brick structure erected by my German great-great grandfather Andrew Stoutner circa 1882 has stood the test of time. Photo: Zillow.com

Best of all, the brick house was obviously well-constructed circa 1882 by my German immigrant great-great grandfather Andrew Stoutner — because it is still standing strong more than 130 years later!

Up next: Andrew Stoutner Sr. poses for a photoPlease stop back! Meanwhile, please visit the blogs of this week’s other Sepia Saturday participants here.

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